Ellen White's Plagiarism of Daniel March

Gary Gent (edited by Brother Anderson)

Ellen White is known to have owned and used these books by Daniel March:

  • Walks and Homes of Jesus (1866)
  • Our Father's House (1870)
  • Night Scenes in the Bible (1872)
  • Home Life in the Bible (1873)

In addition to these, she may also (according to the White Estate) have owned and used:

  • From Dark to Dawn (1879)
  • Days of the Son of Man (1885)

Ellen White wrote in a letter to Mary White:

Send books, red-covered Jewish Antiquities and the Bible Dictionary. Is Night Scenes of the Bible there? If so, send it. (Letter 60, December 8, 1878)

Arthur Maxwell, the SDA who wrote Uncle Arthur's Bed Time Stories and Story of the Bible, seems to have known more about Ellen White's copying than church members were let in on. About the year 1919 he was in a bookstore with Henry Brown. Brown described the incident as follows:

He was considerably older than I, and we were looking over some books in a second-hand bookstore. He pulled down from the shelf a book entitled, Night Scenes in the Bible, by Daniel March. He says, "This is a book from which Mrs. White secured many of her most beautiful pages." I was amazed and stunned.

SDA Professor Fred Veltman was hired by the SDA Church to study Mrs. White's plagiarism in 15 chapters in Desire of Ages. He reported his findings in the October and December 1990 issues of Ministry Magazine. His team found that Daniel March had been used 129 times. If the average for the other chapters was the same as for these, then Daniel March was used in Desire of Ages 748 times. How many times March was used in all of Mrs. White's writings is unknown, but the total must be enormous.

Plagiarism was acknowledged in Ellen White's day, even by SDAs, to be dishonest. If SDAs thought copying was a normal practice, then why would Ellen White repeatedly lie about having done it?

Plagiarism Examples

Daniel March,
Night Scenes in the Bible, 1869
Ellen G. White
We must not defer our obedience till every shadow of uncertainty and every possibility of mistake is removed. The doubt that demands perfect knowledge will never yield to faith, for faith rests upon probability, not demonstration. . . . We must obey the voice of duty when there are many other voices crying against it, and it requires earnest heed to distinguish the one which speaks for God.
p. 88
If you refuse to believe until every shadow of uncertainty and every possibility of doubt is removed, you will never believe. The doubt that demands perfect knowledge will never yield to faith. Faith rests upon evidence, not demonstration. The Lord requires us to obey the voice of duty, when there are other voices all around us urging us to pursue an opposite course. It requires earnest attention from us to distinguish the voice which speaks from God.
Selected Messages, bk. 1, p. 27 (1882)
The heart of the Infinite Father never yearned toward his earthly children with a deeper and more tender compassion than now . . . There never was a time when God was doing more to govern, to instruct and to save the world than he is doing now. To those who look for him the tokens of his presence are manifest everywhere . . .
pp. 88-89
The heart of God never yearned toward His earthly children with deeper love and more compassionate tenderness than now. There never was a time when God was ready and waiting to do more for His people than now. And He will instruct and save all who choose to be saved in His appointed way. Those who are spiritual can discern spiritual things and see tokens of the presence and work of God everywhere.
3T 455.02 (1875)
We must not think that God was more interested in the world in ancient times when he spoke by miracles and prophets and apostles, than he is now when he speaks by his written word and by his holy providence. There never was a time when God was doing more . . . to instruct . . . than he is doing now.
pp. 88-89
In ancient times God spoke to men by the mouth of prophets and apostles.  In these days He speaks to them by the testimonies of His spirit. There was never a time when God instructed His people more earnestly than He instructs them now.
4T 147.04 (also 5T 661.01)
There are deep mysteries in the word of God -- unsearchable mysteries in Divine Providence -- mysteries past finding out in the plan of redemption. . . God's providence is the school in which he is ever setting before us the true aims of life. The term of instruction takes in all our earthly days. None are too young, none are too old to learn, if only they heed the Divine Teacher who "guides with his eye," and who whispers to the wanderer, "This is the way -- walk ye in it."
p. 98-99
There are deep mysteries in the word of God, which will never be discovered by minds that are unaided by the Spirit of God. There are also unsearchable mysteries in the plan of redemption which finite minds can never comprehend . . . God's providence is a continual school, in which He is ever leading men to see the true aims of life. None are too young, and none too old, to learn in this school by paying diligent heed to the lessons taught by the divine Teacher. He is the True Shepherd, and He calls His sheep by name. By the wanderers His voice is heard, saying: "This is the way, walk ye in it."
4T 444.01 (also 4T 163-164)
in the hour of their wildest mirth . . . The handwriting appeared upon the wall of the banqueting-room.
p. 297
At the very moment when the feasting was at its height a bloodless hand came forth and traced on the wall of the banqueting room the doom of the king and his kingdom . . .
Ms. 50, 1893
There is nothing said or done . . . that can escape the Infinite Eye . . . The bloodless hand that wrote in flaming letters . . . is ever writing upon every heart: "God is here -- God is everywhere!" . . . We cannot hide anything from him . . . We cannot escape our accountability to him . . .
p. 298
. . . there is nothing said or done that is not recorded on the books of heaven. The mystic characters traced by the bloodless hand testify that God is a witness to all we do . . . We cannot hide anything from God. We cannot escape from our accountability to Him.
Ms. 50, 1893
Whatever we do, wherever we are, we can never cease to be responsible to him. For he has appointed us to do his work. He has given us the means, the faculties and the opportunity, and he holds us answerable for using them well.
p. 301
Whatever we do, and wherever we may be, we are God's property, and we can never cease to be responsible to him. He has given us faculties, privileges and opportunities, and he holds us responsible for the use to which we put his intrusted gifts.
Signs of the Times, Nov. 26, 1894 (also Ms. 50, 1893)
Whatever we do, wherever we are, we can never cease to be responsible to him. For he has appointed us to do his work. He has given us the means, the faculties and the opportunity, and he holds us answerable for using them well. So far as we are true to our high destiny, we are warranted in looking upon ourselves as co-laborers with the Builder of all worlds, ambassadors of the eternal King, executors of the supreme Will. Thus our accountability to God, fully accepted and faithfully met, will raise us above everything that is mean and selfish and impure. It will make us believe and feel that we always have something great and glorious and good to live for. It will make us earnest, cheerful and strong under all the burdens, discouragements and difficulties of life.
p. 301
Whatever we do, whatever we say, wherever we are, we can never cease our responsibility to God. He has appointed our work. God has given us the means, the faculties and the opportunities, and he holds us accountable for using them well. When we work with a single eye to God's glory . . . we have praise of God, and may consider ourselves as co-laborers with him, as building for eternity. Every one, whether ministers or lay members, are God's embassadors, executing his work .. . . The Judge standeth before the door. Our accountability to God, fully accepted and faithfully met, will balance our characters . . . We shall be, through the grace given unto us, raised above everything that is mean and selfish and impure. It will make us realize that we have something great and good to live for. This close connection with God will make our lives earnest, cheerful, and strong under difficulties, hopeful amid discouragements that will be the lot of all.
Special Testimony to the Battle Creek Church, 1882 (also Signs, Nov. 26, 1894)
What the world wants most is men in whose minds the great thought of responsibility to God is ever present -- men who are made strong by the consciousness that they are doing God's work, and they mean to do it so as to receive his approbation.
pp. 301-302
The church now most want men whose minds can comprehend and bear the thought of their responsibility to God, -- men who are made strong by the consciousness that we are doing God's work, and that they will do it with fidelity.
PH155 22-23
. . . he has appointed us to do his work. He has given us the means, the faculties .. . . he holds us accountable for using them well . . . we are warranted in looking upon ourselves as co-laborers with the Builder of all worlds, ambassadors of the eternal King . . . Thus our accountability to God, fully accepted and faithfully met, will raise us above everything that is mean and selfish and impure. It will make us believe and feel that we always have something great and glorious and good to live for. It will make us earnest, cheerful and strong under all the burdens, discouragements and difficulties of life.
p. 301
Our faculties are given us to be used in the work of God; . . . we shall be co-laborers with the Creator of the universe, ambassadors for Christ. We shall be elevated above the taint of selfishness and moral defilement; and the thought that we are living for a grand and noble purpose, fulfilling the design of our being, will make us earnest, cheerful, and strong under all discouragements and difficulties.
The Health Reformer, Apr. 1, 1878
. . . .our accountability to God . . . will raise us above everything that is mean and selfish and impure. It will make us believe and feel that we always have something great and glorious and good to live for. It will make us earnest, cheerful and strong under all the burdens, discouragements and difficulties of life.
p. 301
They may feel their accountability to labor with Jesus Christ in the great plan of saving souls. If youth will feel their responsibility before God, they will be elevated above everything that is mean, selfish, and impure. Life to such will be full of importance. They will realize that they have something great and glorious to live for. This will have an influence upon youth to make them earnest, cheerful, and strong under all the burdens, discouragements, and difficulties of life . . .
The Youth's Instructor, Sep. 1, 1873
So long as we have a conscience we must have a voice within us to tell us that God's eye is ever fixed upon us, and that we must give account to him for all we do and for all we are. That infinite and awful Witness is in every storehouse, workshop and place of business every day of the week and every hour of the day. His eye scrutinizes every transaction in trade, every quality in goods, every degree of fidelity or neglect in work. His ear catches every word . . . There is nothing said or done or thought that can escape the Infinite Eye. In the deepest solitude we must all have one companion . . . Whatever we do, wherever we are, we can never cease to be responsible to him . . . So far as we are true to our high destiny we are warranted in looking upon ourselves as co-laborers with the Builder of all worlds . . . Thus our accountability to God, fully accepted and faithfully met, will raise us above everything that is mean and selfish and impure . . . so as to receive his approbation.
p. 302
God's eye is fixed upon every individual, and every one must render an account to him for all they do, and for what they permit themselves to be. Wherever we are, in storehouse and workshop, in all our business, every day in the week, and every hour in the day, his eye scrutinizes all our works, his ear listens to our every word. In the deepest solitude every act and word of our lives has still one witness, -- the infinite God. When we are true to the high destiny which he has marked out for us, we become co-laborers with him. If our responsibility be fully and heartily accepted and faithfully discharged, it will secure for us the joyful commendation . . .
The Signs of the Times, Oct. 6, 1881
. . . the only safeguard . . . is not to drink at all. If none ever took a temperate glass [etc.]
p. 296
...the only safeguard for the temperate man is total abstinence.
The Ministry of Healing, p. 446 (1905)
The word of the Lord comes to us all, and it is a message of light and salvation.

If we wait for louder calls or better opportunities, the light may be withdrawn and our path left to us in darkness. No man can tell how much he may lose by once neglecting to comply with the call of God's Spirit. . . The argument which almost convinces today, if rejected, may have less force tomorrow. To have better opportunities in the future we must improve the opportunities of the present with prompt and willing hearts.

We must not defer obedience till every shadow of uncertainty and every possibility of mistake is removed. The doubt that demands perfect knowledge will never yield to faith, for faith rests upon probability, not demonstration.

We must obey the voice of duty when there are many other voices crying against it, and it requires earnest heed to distinguish the one which speaks for God.

He [Elijah] obeyed the Divine voice which sent him forth at the peril of his life.
pp. 201-202

The word of the Lord has come to the people of San Francisco in messages of light and salvation.

If they neglect to improve the present opportunity and wait for louder calls or greater light, the light which has been given may be withdrawn and the path be left in darkness. The light which shines today upon the people and upon the church, if not cherished, will have less force tomorrow. To have better opportunities and great light in the future we must improve the blessings of the present with willing hearts.

Those who defer their obedience till every shadow of uncertainty and every possibility of mistake is removed will never believe and obey. A belief that demands perfect knowledge will never yield. Faith and demonstration are two things. ... Faith rests not upon probability.

The messengers of God must obey the divine voice which sends them with a disagreeable message, even at the peril of life and if there is not one to sustain them.
Letter 22, 1872 (see also Letter 113, 1893)

And the word of the Lord which enjoins a great and perilous duty is the one which we are most likely to receive with doubts and fears. We must not defer obedience till every shadow of uncertainty . . . is removed. The doubt that demands perfect knowledge will never yield to faith, for faith rests upon probability, not demonstration. We must obey the voice of duty when there are many other voices crying against it, and it requires earnest heed to distinguish the one which speaks for God.

The word of the Lord comes to us . . . If we wait for louder calls or better opportunities, the light may be withdrawn and our path left to us in darkness. The argument which convinces to-day, if rejected, may have less force tomorrow.
pp. 201-202

The word of the Lord, spoken through His servants, is received by many with questionings and fears. And many will defer their obedience to the warnings and reproofs given, waiting till every shadow of uncertainty is removed from their minds. The unbelief that demands perfect knowledge will never yield to the evidence that God is pleased to give. He requires of His people faith that rests upon the weight of evidence, not upon perfect knowledge. Those followers of Christ who accept the light that God sends them must obey the voice of God speaking to them when there are many other voices crying out against it. It requires discernment to distinguish the voice of God.

Those who will not act when the Lord calls upon them, but who wait for more certain evidence and more favorable opportunities, will walk in darkness, for the light will be withdrawn. The evidence given one day, if rejected, may never be repeated.
3T 258 (1873)

And the word of the Lord which enjoins a great and perilous duty is the one which we are most likely to receive with doubts and fears. We must not defer obedience till every shadow of uncertainty and every possibility of mistake is removed. The doubt that demands perfect knowledge will never yield to faith . . . faith rests upon probability, not demonstration.
p. 201
The voice of the Lord bidding His faithful ones "go forward" frequently tries their faith to the uttermost. But if they should defer obedience till every shadow of uncertainty was removed from their understanding, and there remained no risk of failure or defeat, they would never move on at all. Those who think it impossible for them to yield to the will of God and have faith in His promises until all is made clear and plain . . . will never yield at all. Faith is not certainty of knowledge . . .
4T 27 (1876)
We must not defer our obedience till every shadow of uncertainty and every possibility of mistake is removed. The doubt that demands perfect knowledge will never yield to faith, for faith rests upon probability, not demonstration . . . We must obey the voice of duty when there are many other voices crying against it, and it requires earnest heed to distinguish the one which speaks for God. We must cherish the impulse of conscience in the moment when it urges us to action, lest it cease from its promptings and we are left to the blind guidance of appetite and passion.

The word of the Lord comes to us all, and it is a message of light and salvation. If we wait for louder calls or better opportunities, the light may be withdrawn and our path left to us in darkness.

No man can tell how much he may lose by once neglecting to comply with the call of God's Spirit and word commanding him to perform some great and sacred duty. Many would give everything they have . . . to hear again the call which they . . . neglected. The argument which almost convince us to-day, if rejected, may have less force to-morrow. To have better opportunities in the future we must improve the opportunities of the present with prompt and willing hearts.

Nothing will help us more in the discharge of duty than the feeling which made Elijah speak of himself as standing before the Lord of hosts . . . he would not do what would offend the eyes of the Eternal King. He had no fear before a human monarch because his mind was holden by the more awful presence of a Sovereign whose empire is the universe and who holds in his hand the destinies of time and eternity . . .

Let us . . . cultivate the feeling that in every place we stand before the Lord, in every . . . work we are doing the will of the Most High . . . and then the whole of life will have a meaning and a sacredness which earthly honors can never give . . .

The thoughts of the heart and the words of the lip, and all the acts of the outward life, will be most worthy and appropriate when the presence of the Infinite One is most deeply felt.

In every place let your adoring heart be ready to say, "Lo! God is here." . . . Every walk in life shall be made . . . pure . . .

. . . the indulgence of ease and a life of pleasure . . . It is the ruin of too many that they set their hearts upon having all their good things in their lifetime.

It is not the chief end of man to achieve what the world will applaud as success. It is our main business in life to show ourselves true men, loving righteousness, hating evil, and willing to take such measure of present happiness and success as flows from obedience to the truth. There is unconquerable strength which begins with the confession of weakness . . . The great loss which we have most need to deplore is the loss of earnestness to do right, the loss of strength to resist temptation, the loss of faith in the everlasting principles of truth and duty.

The poorest man . . . has something to live and die for so long as he preserves the integrity of his own conscience. The most successful man . . . is the man who gives himself most earnestly to the cause of God and truth, and who never bates one jot of heart or hope in his good work, whatever difficulties and delays he may have to meet.

Never say "It is enough," long as you have one wrong disposition in your own heart to subdue -- . . . long as patience and faith and love and devotion to duty are the great lessons to be taught and learned -- long as God says he will never forsake the soul that trusts in him and seeks his aid -- long as the crown of life is offered only to him that overcometh. . . . there is something to do . . . for the better life to come. . . . while life lasts . . .
pp. 201-204, 207, 221

If you refuse to believe until every shadow of uncertainty and every possibility of doubt is removed you will never believe. The doubt that demands perfect knowledge will never yield to faith. Faith rests upon evidence, not demonstration. The Lord requires us to obey the voice of duty, when there are other voices all around us urging us to pursue an opposite course. It requires earnest attention from us to distinguish the voice which speaks from God. We must resist and conquer inclination, and obey the voice of conscience without parleying or compromise, lest its prompting cease and will and impulse control.

The word of the Lord comes to us all who have not resisted His Spirit by determining not to hear and obey. This voice is heard in warnings, in counsels, in reproof. It is the Lord's message of light to His people. If we wait for louder calls or better opportunities, the light may be withdrawn, and we be left in darkness.

By once neglecting to comply with the call of God's Spirit and His word, when obedience involves a cross, many have lost much -- how much they will never know till the books are opened at the final day. The pleadings of the Spirit, neglected today because pleasure or inclination leads in an opposite direction, may be powerless to convince , or even impress, tomorrow. To improve the opportunities of the present, with prompt and willing hearts . . .

. . . is the only way to grow in grace and the knowledge of the truth. We should ever cherish a sense that, individually, we are standing before the Lord of hosts; no word, no act, no thought, even, should be indulged to offend the eye of the Eternal One. We shall then have no fear of man or of earthly power, because a Monarch, whose empire is the universe, who holds in His hands our individual destinies for time and eternity, is taking cognizance of all our work.

If we would feel that in every place we are the servants of the Most High, we would be more circumspect; our whole life would possess to us a meaning and a sacredness which earthly honors can never give.

The thoughts of the heart, the words of the lips, and every act of the life, will make our character more worthy, if the presence of God is continually felt.

Let the language of the heart be: "Lo, God is here." Then the life will be pure . . .

Many are ruined by their desire for a life of ease and pleasure . . . They set their hearts upon having the good things of this life.

This is human success, but is it not won at the expense of future, eternal interests? The great business of life is to show ourselves to be true servants of God, loving righteousness and hating iniquity. We should accept gratefully such measures of present happiness and present success as are found in the path of duty. Our greatest strength is realized when we feel and acknowledge our weakness. The greatest loss which any one of you in Battle Creek can suffer is the loss of earnestness and persevering zeal to do right, the loss of strength to resist temptation, the loss of faith in the principles of truth and duty.

Let no man flatter himself that he is a successful man unless he preserves the integrity of his conscience, giving himself wholly to the truth and to God. We should move steadily forward, never losing heart or hope in the good work, whatever trials beset our path, whatever moral darkness may encompass us.

Patience, faith, and love for duty are the lessons we must learn. Subduing self and looking to Jesus is an everyday work. The Lord will never forsake the soul that trusts in Him and seeks His aid. The crown of life is placed only upon the brow of the overcomer. There is . . . earnest, solemn work for God while life lasts.
5T 68-70 (1882)

We are all living in the land of bondage and of death. We are bound with chains which are . . . impossible to break.
p. 122
We are living in a land of bondage and of death. Multitudes are enslaved by sinful customs and by evil habits, and their fetters are difficult to break.
Advent Review & Sabbath Herald, Sep. 14, 1886
In the vision of the Apocalypse, four mighty angels were seen holding back the four winds of the earth's perils and sorrows, and forbidding them to blow till God's servants were sealed and safe . . . But he leaves the ministers of vengeance to pour all their tempests and thunders upon the dark way of transgression. Set it down, then, as a first article of your practical faith -- the servants of God are always safe. The way of obedience to him, however hard and dark it may seem, is always the path of life.

The law of duty is supreme. It claims authority over reason and conscience, over talents and possessions, over everything that is greatest and noblest in man. It admits no rival, makes no abatement of its high demands, enters into no compromises with any opposing power. The voice of duty is the voice of God in our souls. Obedience to its claims brings us into living and personal agreement with the highest law in the universe.
pp. 241-242

Four mighty angels are still holding the four winds of the earth. Terrible destruction . . . accidents by land and sea; the loss of life [etc. etc.] . . . the angels hold the four winds, forbidding the terrible power of Satan to be exercised in its fury until the servants of God are sealed in their foreheads . . . The ministers of vengeance will pour all the terrible judgments upon a God-forsaken people. The way of obedience is the only path of life.

What is my duty? . . . Talents, possession, everything that is great and noble in man he calls to be exercised in his work. Duty admits no rival, enters into no compromise with any opposing powers. The most precious friends and relatives must not step in between your duty and your God. The voice of duty is the voice of God in our souls. Obedience to its claims brings us into living personal agreement with the highest law in the universe . . .
Advent Review & Sabbath Herald, June 7, 1887

. . . Every moment of ease or self-indulgence secured by neglecting the Divine call to earnest and self-denying duty, sows the seed for harvests of sorrow and . . . remorse. Every step upon the path which God forbids is a step toward destruction.

The way of obedience to him, however hard and dark it may seem, is always the path of life. The law of duty is supreme. It claims authority over reason and conscience, over talents and possessions, over everything that is greatest and noblest in man. It admits no rival, makes no abatement of its high demands, enters into no compromises with any opposing power. The voice of duty is the voice of God in our souls . Obedience to its claims brings us into living and personal agreement with the highest law in the universe. It lends greatness to the humblest occupation, crowns the lowliest position in life with glory and honor, brings man into alliance with God, associates him with plans and purposes that have existed in the Infinite Mind from eternity . . . In every act of duty we go out of ourselves, and beyond the narrow scope of present interest selfish gratification.

. . . we present the homage of our hearts to the supreme and eternal Sovereign . . . No man can cease to believe that he ought to do God's will . . . We can no more flee from duty than we can flee from the presence of the infinite Jehovah. It is only by obedience to him that we can have peace. You may not think so now. It may seem to you that much is to be gained and little to be lost by denying for the present God's claim upon your heart. But in that gentle whisper of duty, which you now so easily deny or suppress, is the very hiding of God's infinite power over you to make you happy . . .
pp. 241-244

Every gratification or indulgence secured by neglecting the divine call to earnest, self-denying duty, is sowing the seed for a harvest of like kind. Every step in the path that God has forbidden is a step toward destruction.

The way of obedience to God, however hard and trying it may seem to you, is always the path of life. The law of duty is supreme. It claims authority over reason and conscience, over talents and possessions. It will admit no rival, and will not for one moment abate its high demands. It enters into no compromise with any oppressive power of earth. Obedience to God brings the soul into agreement with the highest laws in the universe. It imparts dignity and true greatness to the humblest occupation where Christ can preside. It crowns the lowliest position in life with the highest honors, bringing men into alliance with God and binding up His interests with plans and purposes that have existence in the infinite mind from eternity. In every act of duty we are hiding self in Jesus. We reach out beyond ourselves, beyond the narrow scope of selfish and present gratification.

. . . not to secure a mere assent to the truth, but for heart service. He desires the homage of your soul. You cannot cease to believe that you ought to do the will of God. You can no more release yourself from the claims of duty than you can flee from the presence of God. It is only in obedience to God that you will realize true happiness. You may not think so now, because your senses are not spiritually awake. It may seem to you that much is to be gained and little is to be lost by remaining in a large degree insensible to the claims of God upon our heart, and deaf to His voice. But in the whispering of the Spirit of God to you is the power of God to quicken and elevate your mind and make you happy . . .
Letter 21a, 1893 (14MR 11-12)

But let them go up to the mount of God where man meets his Maker in humble, trusting prayer . . . look only to Him who sees everything at one view and governs everything with a word. . . . he will hear their voice and attend to their wants. And then the darkness . . . will vanish from their minds. . . . In every act of sincere prayer the soul comes into living contact with the infinite Mind. We see no face bending over us with looks of compassion. No hand is let down for us to grasp . . .
p. 339-340
If you come to God, feeling helpless and dependent, . . . in humble, trusting prayer make your wants known to Him whose knowledge is infinite, who sees everything in creation, and who governs everything by His will and word, He can and will attend to your cry and will let light shine into your heart and all around you; for through sincere prayer your soul is brought into connection with the mind of the Infinite. You may have no remarkable evidence at the time that the face of the Redeemer is bending over you in compassion and love, but this is even so. You may not feel His invisible touch, but His hand is upon you.
3T 323 (1873)
. . . to make their way along the dark and crooked paths . . . Let them leave all the false guides which they have been following, and look only to Him who sees everything at one view and governs everything . . . he will hear their voice and attend to their wants.
p. 339
. . . to grope their way among dark and crooked paths . . . strengthen them not to put confidence in false guides, but to obey and worship Him only who made and governs everything. "He sees and knows everything," they continually repeated to themselves. "He will hear our prayers, and attend unto our wants . . ."
Historical Sketches, p. 243 (1886)

Category: Plagiarism
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